Tuesday, October 16, 2012

Passion, Passion, A Passionate Cook - Jacqueline Hopkins




Thanks Jacqueline for stopping by tell us a little about your recipe.

Mom’s chili was what we ate on our snowmobile rides all over kingdom come of Idaho and it was very tasty and warmed you right up. If she put a lot of Cayenne pepper in it, you couldn’t each too much. If there were other families riding with us and they ate the chili, someone would always ask, “Why doesn’t the chili have beans in it?”
My mother would reply, “Because true chili doesn’t have beans in it and we like it this way.”
So Lyn, my heroine, made the chili for every guiding trip she was on and it always elicited an argument from one of the men about the lack of beans in it, and this trip with Nic was no different in Wilderness Heart.
I hope you enjoy the Wilderness Chili as well as reading about Lyn and Nic’s little conflicts, and the overall book as I did writing it. 


Wilderness Chili
Ingredients
3 pounds stew meat
3 pounds hamburger
1 large white or yellow onion, chopped
2 large cans tomato sauce
1 dozen cloves garlic, chopped
1 tablespoon sugar
1 teaspoon cumin
1 teaspoon marjoram
1 teaspoon chili powder
4 teaspoons salt
2-3 teaspoons paprika (approximately, see step 6 below)
2-3 teaspoons cayenne pepper (approximately, see step 6
below, or depending on how hot you like your chili)
3-4 tablespoons cornmeal to thicken (see step 8 below)
Directions
1. Brown stew meat in a large skillet. Place browned meat
into a large cooking pot or a crockpot.
2. Cook hamburger until done; drain (set aside for use in
step 3 below) and place in the large cooking pot with
the browned stew meat.
3. Chop the large onion and sauté in the grease from the
hamburger.
4. Fill the cooking pot or crockpot with water until it
covers the meat.
5. Add the 2 large cans of tomato sauce, the garlic
(chopped), sugar, cumin, marjoram, chili powder, and
salt.
6. Add the paprika and cayenne pepper until the seething
mass looks like the inside of an old red inner tube.
(Until it has a reddish/orange tint to it).
7. Cook on medium if you are using a crockpot for 3-4
hours. If using a large cooking pot, cook on a medium
161
to low heat (to simmer, not boiling) for 4-6 hours. Keep
checking it for water content. If water goes way below
top of meat mixture, add more water.
8. When stew meat is tender, thicken the chili with the
cornmeal about a half hour before serving.
9. Serve with your choice of crackers or buttered
cornbread. Freeze leftovers.

Lyn Taylor loves her job as an Idaho wilderness hunting guide, but her world is complicated. It is a man's job in a man's world where she must constantly prove she is very capable and qualified to guide men on their hunts. On top of her father barely engaging in life since the death of Lyn's mother, Lyn has second thoughts about marrying and having a man in her life.

But that was before she met Nic Randall, a lumber man, who comes from Montana to find timber to be bid on and milled. He is convinced she can't handle the job as their guide because she is a woman and she is, of course, insulted. Nevertheless, neither has much choice and are forced to spend day and night together for the seven day hunt. Lyn is not happy -- just how much is a confident, independent woman suppose to put up with?


You can find Jacque all over the internet (including an old genealogy web site still floating out there in cyberspace and sadly needs updating) below:

Follow Jacque’s blog over here – http://jacquehopkins.blogspot.com
Check out Wilderness Heart on Amazon - http://amzn.to/rFdoOg Price: $2.99
Createspace Page (for paperback) - https://www.createspace.com/3565575
Kobo link – www.bit.ly/PM9hog
Sony link – www.bit.ly/OZOWNx
Barnes & Noble link – www.bit.ly/Iuqxhe
Diesel link – www.bit.ly/Q20bWL
On Publish My Book link – www.bit.ly/NeJt7c
On XinXii link – www.bit.ly/NVCXh8
Game Page – www.freado.com/users/27790/Jacqueline-Hopkins where you can play games to win a copy of her book.
Twitter Jacque at @jacquehopkins
Amazon Author’s Page – http://amzn.to/wSgCEk

Thanks Jacque for stopping by,

Anita

No comments:

Post a Comment